Review: Songlines

It’s hard enough being a teenage girl trying to make it through high school. But when you find out that you’re a Guardian of the Garden of Eden…well, things get much harder.

Songlines-Full-Res-Bookcover-whiteLainie Gracewood has lived her whole life in Nalong and has dreamed of leaving the farmland she knows for big adventures in the city. But when she suddenly starts getting visions, things get complicated. Harry, a farmhand, breaks the news to Lainie that she is in fact a Cherubim that has been appointed to guard the entrance to the Garden of Eden. However, with the threat of miners looming on the horizon, Lainie doesn’t have the easiest job.

Songlines is a unique tale told from an Australian standpoint, not something you see these days. Carolyn Denman does a fantastic job of blending religion with fantasy in this inspiring novel of family, friendship, and responsibility. With flair for the dramatic, Denman produces a story that you won’t want to stop reading. While I felt that the beginning was a little dull (and we were suddenly thrown into the meat of the story), I couldn’t make myself put this one down. You can bet I’m eagerly awaiting the second installment of this fabulous story!

**I received a copy of this book from BookSirens for an honest review.**

What’s a Soulmate?

We’re not necessarily “snowed in” this weekend but I’m definitely enjoying staying cozied up with some good books while it’s cold outside. Seriously, this is my kind of reading weather. I love to stay snuggled up in the blankets with a book and a cup of coffee (or cocoa in this case).

What’s a Soulmate? has been on my TBR list for quite some time. It fell to the wayside as I got caught up with other books. But I finally got to read it!

51ucjvlvw-lMeet Libby Carmichael, a seventeen-year-old girl whose only focus is making clothes, getting prepared for college, and listening to whatever drama her best friend Beth has going on. Her world is filled with blacks and whites. There is no color. Until one day, she meets her Soulmate and her entire universe explodes in vibrancy.

Andrew McCormack has had a bad day. Being detained for assaulting a police officer tends to do that to a person. But then he sees Libby, and the drab juvenile detention center becomes the most colorful part of his world. But how do you have a relationship with your Soulmate when there is perpetually a barrier between you?

I was thoroughly excited to read this story. The concept is phenomenal and not something I’d seen or heard of before. To live in a world devoid of color until you meet your Soulmate is an interesting theory. Lindsey Ouimet does a wonderful job of fleshing out that theory and making a reader crave the relationship between our two main characters. There is intrigue, mystery, and of course romance in every page. However, I found myself getting rather bored with the story and wanting to just skim through to the next interesting part. I felt like bits of it dragged and I lost interest more than once.

Overall, I believe What’s a Soulmate? is a great read for any teen and something you won’t see on every shelf in every bookstore.

Brave Enough

I’m still not a fan of ebooks (yeah, yeah, I know). But I will admit that I’ve been burning through them pretty quickly the past few days. So yay!

916pvurak0lBrave Enough is the tale of two teenagers from totally different worlds, connected through one major disease: cancer. Cason Martin has grown up in the world of ballet. Her mother has pushed her from day one to be the best and has been more like a coach than a mother. Until one day, Cason collapses during an important audition and her perfect dance world comes crashing down around her.

Davis Channing is a survivor. He made it through his lymphoma only to try and destroy everything the doctors and nurses worked to save with drugs. Davis battles with his addiction throughout this novel while finding himself falling in love with Cason. But in the end will their love survive all the obstacles?

Brave Enough follows your typical formula for any other teenage drama. And while this book seemed bland to begin with, I found myself getting invested in the characters. I even may have shed a tear or two. Both inspirational and simple, it’s a nice easy read for anyone looking for a bit of drama in their life. Kati Gardner touches on a ton of different social issues throughout the entire book while managing not to delve too deeply into most of them. I appreciate Gardner’s attempt to look at the many dimensions of teenage life but I felt she tried to pack too much into one book. That being said, it was a stellar read and worth picking up!

**I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in return for an honest review.**