Life is Like a Parade

Tommy Taylor has spent the last twenty-seven months in the Peace Corps, helping those in need in Panama. And while he’s enjoyed his time there, it’s time to come home. His main goal once he’s back in the US? Have his first kiss.

32738278._uy630_sr1200,630_Life is like a Parade is a funny romantic novel from the perspective of the guy. I loved the new look on a typical romance story. L. Henry Smith does a wonderful job of creating characters that are funny, loveable, yet they’re two-dimensional. The writing fell a bit flat for me as some metaphors were over used.

When we’re introduced to Tommy, his only thought is of asking out a girl, Mandi, when he gets the chance. But we only really see Mandi once or twice throughout the entire novel. Instead, a woman named Jamie becomes the focus of Tommy’s endeavors. The book was short, a mere 170 pages, and reads very quickly. But towards the end, it felt as if Smith tried to tie up the loose-ends, almost as if he had a word count limit he needed to meet.

For those looking for a quick chuckle and maybe a few romantic feels, Life is Like a Parade would be perfect. For those looking for a little more substance, I suggest looking elsewhere.

They Called Me Wyatt

When Jordanian student Siwar Salaiha is murdered on her birthday in College Park, Maryland, her consciousness survives, finding refuge in the body of a Seattle baby boy. Stuck in this speech delayed three-year old body, Siwar tries but fails to communicate with Wyatt’s parents, instead she focuses on solving the mystery behind her murder. Eventually, her consciousness goes into a dormant state after Wyatt undergoes a major medical procedure.

Fast-forward twenty-two years. Wyatt is a well-adjusted young man with an affinity towards the Middle East and a fear of heights. While working on his graduate degree in Middle Eastern studies, Wyatt learns about Siwar’s death, which occurred twenty-five years ago. For reasons he can’t explain, he grows obsessed with Siwar and spends months investigating her death, which police at the time erroneously ruled as suicide. His investigation forces him to open a door he has kept shut all his life, a spiritual connection to an unknown entity that he frequently refused to acknowledge. His leads take him to Amman, Jordan where after talking to her friends and family members and through his special connection with the deceased, he discovers a clue that unravels the mystery of her death. Will Siwar get justice after all?

img_0855Let me just say, They Called Me Wyatt is not something I would have picked up on my own. However, reading the synopsis seriously intrigued me and I found myself sucked into this strange and unique story of Siwar and Wyatt. They Called Me Wyatt was an entertaining read for sure and lovers of supernatural mysteries will love it! However, I felt like I was drowning in the details of Siwar’s life. While I enjoyed getting to know her, and she was a well-developed character, I couldn’t get attached to her or to Wyatt for that matter. The chapters interweave between Siwar stuck in Wyatt and her time in Jordan as well as in the US before her death. That is until halfway through the book when the story is picked up by Wyatt solely.

Dying was not the worst part. It was what came after dying.

I’m a stickler for well-edited books and this one definitely needs to be edited as there were many grammatical issues I found that distracted me from the story. Still, Natasha Tynes has created a remarkable and unique mystery that I think many will enjoy! I have never read anything quite like what she has written. The way she manages to fit the pieces of the puzzle together are outstanding and I look forward to reading many more of her works!

**I received a copy of this book from the author for an honest review.**

Foreverafter: An Odd Adventure

Every now and then, you just need a light read. Something quick but still interesting. Ebooks have definitely turned into that for me. On average, it takes me about two days to finish them (because I usually only read them in the afternoons).

Foreverafter: An Odd Adventure has been sitting on my Kindle for over a year now. I finally decided to read it and was pleasantly surprised by how quick of a read it was. All in all, it took me about 2 hours to finish. Perfect for any middle-schooler to enjoy!

img-0842Audrey, otherwise known as Odd, is tired of being bored. Living with her mother in a town where nothing happens, the only adventure she finds in her life is whenever her friend Kite visits. Kite ran away from the circus and every little bit makes his way to Odd’s town to tell her of his stories and perform a few tricks for the locals. But one day, his small performance is overshadowed (literally) by a floating island that has suddenly appeared.

Seeing her opportunity for adventure, Odd drags Kite to board the island and see what’s in store. But suddenly, they find themselves in a totally different world and must make their way home in a strange and sometimes weird land.

Do you ever read those books that after you’re finished you just sit back and think “what”? That’s basically what it was like reading Foreverafter. While it definitely kept my interest and the characters were unique, I found myself feeling like my brain had been scrambled by it all simply because of the strangeness. There is a podcast my husband enjoys listening to called Welcome to Nightvale. This book reminded me of a mixture of that podcast and a bit of Alice’s Wonderland.

K.J. Quint has definitely got me hooked as I would love to see how Odd and Kite find their way out of this strangeness and if they even make it back home.