Review | Of Blood and Bone

It’s been years since the Doom wreaked havoc on the world. And as the remaining population finds a way to survive, Lana and Simon are enjoying their growing family as their time grows short with their daughter. The One is quickly coming of age and will head on her own path to fight the dark that threatens to swallow the world. But even if she’s the chosen one, things won’t be easy.

Screen Shot 2020-02-25 at 9.48.31 AMAfter reading Year One, I couldn’t wait to get my hands on the sequel. I wanted to catch up with all my favorite characters and see where the story went. But I have to be honest, I was a little disappointed with Of Blood and Bone. While the story did move along, the writing seemed very disjointed, as if Nora Roberts wasn’t quite sure how to fill in the time between the first book and whatever comes after this one. For me, there was an overuse of commas which broke up the flow and seemed unnecessary in some cases.

I couldn’t connect with any of the new characters and felt like this one fell flat. There was less detail in Of Blood and Bone than there was in Year One. It was almost as if Roberts just got tired of writing. I was unimpressed. However, you guys know me, and I’m someone compelled to finish out a series that I’ve started regardless of if there’s been a bad book in the lineup. So I’ll be picking up The Rise of Magicks here in a few weeks and hope that the story picks back up. All in all, Of Blood and Bone wasn’t a bad read but it definitely didn’t meet my expectations after the first book.

Lullaby Road

IMG_1630I have never read any of James Anderson’s novels. But I was sent Lullaby Road for review and was a little disconcerted finding out that it was a sequel. I worried that I wouldn’t be able to follow the story having nothing to go on from the previous book. However, that worry was unfounded.

Lullaby Road stands well on its own. Following Ben Jones in his truck along highway 117 in Utah made for some interesting adventures. The desert can do some strange things to a person’s mind as we are shown time and time again. Ben himself even has to contend with what the desert has made of him. From the very beginning we are thrown into a strange situation. Ben has stopped by his transport station to pick up a load but also winds up taking a child and a dog that won’t leave its side. As he struggles to make his run with the child, the dog, and his neighbor’s infant, he must also solve a major mystery and a web of lies that has entwined most of the small towns linked by his truck route.

James Anderson has a way of pulling the reader into the story and making them comfortable. Like a warm bed on a cold winter morning, Lullaby Road was hard to get out of. While I wasn’t particularly happy with the ending, I can’t help but applaud Anderson’s ability to weave a tale of intrigue, suspense, and sarcasm.

I was given this book from Blogging for Books for review.